Tuesday, March 03, 2020

Pandemic Prep Shopping. Of course I am.

Is anyone surprised that I am a thousand percent into pandemic prep?

No?

I didn't think so.

I read this Scientific American blog and was totally persuaded (baaaaaaaa), so here's what I did:

1. Evaluated our grocery supply. I think we always have 2 weeks of food in the house on any given day. Is it all food I'd be excited to eat? No way. But it's there.
2. Decided to buy extra dry and frozen goods every week at the store (not a lot-- this week, I bought more processed stuff than usual and spent less than $40 more).
3. Subscribed to more paper products, etc from Amazon. We let our Costco membership lapse, so I have been doing all of my bulk shopping on Amazon, and I really like not worrying about paper products, dog food, this one tea I really like and can't find in town, etc. (Yes, I have ethical problems with Amazon, but I also have ethical problems with the demands on middle-class working women with kids, and if my kitchen robot can help me shop for my things and take away the mental and physical burden of hauling so much shit into the house all of the time, then it's a trade off I am making right now).
4. Stocked up on all of our OTC meds, Cooper's inhalers, and other prescription drugs. What's an FSA account for if not to pay full price for stuff the insurance won't cover because it's not time for a refill (EYE ROLL TIMES ONE THOUSAND)?

Things I still need to do:
1. Buy a vat of hand sanitizer before other panic preppers like me hoard it all
2. Stock up on bleach, Lysol, vinegar, hand soap, laundry detergent, and dish soap
3. Make sure all of the bathrooms are fully stocked with lotion, soap, shampoo, toothpaste, etc

Again, these are all things we normally have in the house and buy on the regular. I just don't want to be in a position where I have to run out and get them.

Things I am not buying:
MASKS.

Why? Simple. They don't prevent you from getting the virus. Healthcare professionals who are always around sick or immunosuppressed people needs them. They make you wash your hands less frequently and touch your face more often because you feel a false sense of protection.

Am I the only doomsday shopper I know? Anything else I should make sure to buy?

2 comments:

Lisa R. said...

My mom's shopping consisted of three cases of bottled water plus a 3 gallon jug for their water dispenser, a case of chef boyardee, a case of chili, a case of jasmine rice, the biggest box of instant oatmeal I've ever seen, a crate of pretzels, a ton of paper plates and bowls, and a big 10 pack of tissues. She also snagged one of the last giant containers of hand sanitizer in the store, some powdered eggs (she didn't read the package, it's the equivalent of 68 real eggs), and some textured vegetable protein. And she stocked up for her pets. That's for her and her wife. I, with my four boys (ages 12, 6, 3, and 4 months) haven't stockpiled anything except toilet paper. But I would agree, we probably have about two weeks worth of random food. And I still have a TON of diapers from my baby shower (p.s. do a diaper raffle if you have a shower/sprinkle!).

Holly Sisk said...

I haven’t prepped at all but I just read the Scientific American blog and now I feel like I need to at least think about my options. I moved my StepDad in to my house in 2018 when he was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s so I need to think about his needs too. He goes through cycles where all he wants to eat is pie or muffins or ice cream but having all that on hand is a challenge. The problem is i don’t know if quarantine time will fall on his pie kick or muffin kick. As long as we have electricity, we have ice cream as I buy crazy amounts when his favorite brand is on sale. I could live on peanut butter and cereal but he’s not like that. I don’t have children but i feel like he’s an adult size toddler who I cannot just order to do what i want.
I guess I’ll order some staples and paper goods and then get a little extra each grocery delivery.